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Eating one's own dogfood -vs- dining out

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The importance of project management tools is almost never fully appreciated. I am shocked at how common it is for a group of developers to go working without version control, ticket tracking, development documentation and so on. The very first thing I do when working with a new client is to make sure that they get these tools in place if they haven't already.

Those who are used to working without a complete set of project management tools never fail to appreciate the benefits of them once they are introduced. I consider it next to impossible for a team to work together without managing code and tasks in an efficient and highly organized way.[img_assist|nid=155|title=|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=250|height=156]

Hopefully you do not need to be sold on this idea and are using CVS or SVN to manage your project already. You likely have some sort of ticket system. It is a little less likely that you have both of these components integrated with each other.

When it comes to choosing a solution for project management software, a die-hard Drupal user has a dilemna. On one hand, Drupal seems as though it should be the perfect solution. It's fully customizable, has lots of nifty project management related modules and, most importantly, it's Drupal! Why would you not use it? "Eating your own dogfood" is the way to go, right? Meh...

Views Bulk Operations beta release

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Views Bulk OperationsViews bulk operations is ready for some beta testers.

It is essentially the admin nodes page on steroids. It enables you to perform node operations as well as actions from a custom view.

Book Access module

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Drupal books are a great way to organize content. Unfortunately, there is no way to control access to individual books by default. Like default forums, it's all or nothing.

The Book Access module adds the ability to set view, edit and delete access control for individual books and all pages therein.  

This module has no official release as it needs to be tested. The development snapshot is ready for testing though.

Spam: The Final Solution

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Until the mid 90s, spam was a non-issue. It was exciting to get email. The web was also virtually spam-free. Netizens respected one another and everything was very pleasant. Spam Those days are long gone. Fortunately, there are some pretty amazing tools out there for fighting email spam. I use a combination of SpamAssassin on the server side and Thunderbird (with its wonderful built in junkmail filters) on the desktop. I am sent thousands of spam messages a day that I never see thanks to these tools.

But approximately five years ago, a new type of spam emerged which exploited not email but the web. Among this new wave of abuse, my personal favorite, comment spam.

I love getting comments on my blog. I also like reading comments on other blogs. However, it's not practical to simply allow anyone who wants to leave a comment, as within a very short period of time, blog comments will be overrun with spam generated by scripts that exploit sites with permissive comment privileges. To prevent this, most sites require that you log in to post a comment. But this may be too much to ask of someone who just wants to post a quick comment as they pass through. I often come across blog postings which I would like to contribute to, but I simply don't bother because the site requires me to create an account (which I'd likely only use once) before posting a comment. Not worth it. Another common practice is the use of "captchas" which require a user enter some bit of information to prove they are human and not a script. This works fairly well, however, it is still a hurdle that must be jumped before a user can post a comment. And as I've personally learned, captchas, particularly those that are image based, are prone to problems which may leave users unable to post a comment at all.

Opcode Cache for Dummies

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PHP is an interpreted language. This means that each time a PHP generated page is requested, the server must read in the various files needed and "compile" them into something the machine can understand (opcode). A typical Drupal page requires more than a dozen of these bits of code be compiled.

Opcode cache mechanisms preserve this generated code in cache so that it need only be generated a single time to server hundreds or millions of subsequent requests.

Enabling opcode cache will reduce the time it takes to generate a page by up to 90%.

Vroom! PHP is known for its blazing speed. Why would you want to speed up your PHP applications even more? Well, first and foremost is the coolness factor. Next, you'll increase the capacity of your current server(s) many times over, thereby postponing the inevitable need to add new hardware as your site's popularity explodes. Lastly, high bandwidth, low latency visitors to your site who are currently seeing page load times in the 1-2 second range will be shocked to find your vamped up site serving up pages almost instantaneously. After enabling opcode cache on my own server, I saw page loads drop from about 1.5 seconds to as low as 300ms. Now that's good fun the whole family can enjoy.

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